Mountains Aligned with Coastal Extremes

In Sacred Geometry of the Earth we found a topographical ‘rule’ that can be applied to the great majority of landmasses we investigated. The rule can be summarised as follows.

In more than 95% of cases the highest hill or mountain on a landmass is in alignment with two cardinal landmass extremes.

Each landmass has a most northerly, southerly, easterly and westerly point, which are often peninsulas or headlands jutting into the sea, but are sometimes simply gently curving coastlines. When lines are drawn between the established four cardinal extreme points, one of these lines will pass over the highest hill/mountain on the landmass in about 25% of cases. However, if the highest point is not aligned in this way, a line from the summit over one of the four cardinal extremes will continue over water to a cardinal extreme on an adjacent landmass. Among the fifty high points in the examples that follow there is only one that is not aligned in this way.

The website Peakbagger.com provides a list of the fifty highest ranked mountains on islands around the world. Six of these summits are on ice islands in Antarctica, which have been omitted because current Google Earth images do not clearly define these landmasses. For this reason the next six in the ranking have been included to bring the total number of mountains shown in the images below to fifty.

These images simply illustrate what can be seen in far greater detail by zooming in on Google Earth. Using the ruler on Google Earth the alignment between the peninsulas at the cardinal extremes of the landmasses and the highest summit can be more easily ascertained. In all the images that follow, when the precise coastal extreme points are joined, the line always passes over some part of the highest mountain; the summit, flank or base. (When a line is drawn precisely over the summit point it joins the tip of one cardinal peninsula and the base of another with notable regularity.)

Such alignments may be expected with some regularity on smaller islands but with larger landmasses the probability of such alignments occurring repeatedly by chance are greatly reduced. On the large islands of Sumatra and Borneo the highest summit is aligned between the northern and southern peninsulas in both cases, whilst on Java the highest summit aligns between the northern and eastern peninsulas.

This natural topographical order is illustrated by the fifty images that follow.

1. Carstensz Pyramid New Guinea

1. A line from the western extreme of New Guinea passing over the summit of the Carstensz Pyramid (also called Puncak Jaya) extends to a small chevron shaped peninsula at the western extreme of Goodenough Island. The precise line between the coastal extremes passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

2. Mauna Kea Hawaii big island

2. A line from the eastern extreme of Hawaii passing over the summit of Mauna Kea extends to a chevron shaped peninsula on Ni’ihau. The two lines shown flank the summit of Mauna Kea and extend to the northern and southern extremes of Ni’ihau.

 

3. Kinabalu Borneo

3. A line from the tip of the chevron shaped peninsula at the southern extreme of Borneo passing over the summit of Kinabalu extends to the northernmost peninsula on the island, a finger of land about 500 meters long. The line passes over the base of this finger.

 

4. Yu Shan Taiwan

4. A difficult alignment to resolve because much of Taiwan’s western extreme is reclaimed land. The line shown passes from the chevron shaped peninsula in the west, over the summit of Yu Shan and extends over the ocean to the southern extreme of small island of Yonaguni-shima.

 

5. Gunung Kerinci Sumatra

5. A line drawn from the northern extreme of Sumatra passing over the summit of Gunung Kerinci extends to the island’s most southerly peninsula. The precise line between the southern and northern extreme points passes over the flank of Gunung Kerinci.

 

6. Mt Erebus Ross Island

6. A line from the eastern to the western peninsulas of Ross Island passes over the summit of Mount Erebus. These cardinal limits of the island are ill defined on Google Earth, the precise summit alignment is found between points located on the easterly and westerly peninsulas.

 

7. Mt Fuji Honshu

7. A line from the summit of Mount Fuji passing over the eastern extreme of Honshu extends to the eastern peninsula of Hokkaido. The peninsula is about 30 kilometres long and shaped like a finger; the line passes over the base of the finger. The precise line joining the two coastal extremes extends to the base of Mount Fuji.

 

8. Mt Cook New Zealand

8. A line from the southern extreme of South Island passing over the summit of Mount Cook extends to the northern extreme of North Island, cutting off the most northerly lump of land. The precise line joining the two coastal extremes passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

9. Gunung Rinjani Lombok

9. A line from the western extreme of Lombok passing over the summit of Gunung Rinjani extends to the western extreme of Pulau Lawang.

 

No image for Number 10?

10. Pico de Teide on Tenerife is a single exception to the ‘rule’ of alignment found among the fifty islands. Despite the number of surrounding islands there are no two adjacent coastal extreme points that are in alignment with this summit.

 

11. Gunnbjorn Fjeld Greenland

11. A line from the chevron shaped peninsula on the western tip of Iceland passing over the summit of Gunnbjorn Fjeld extends to the western peninsula of Greenland. The line passes over a base point on this finger shaped peninsula. The precise line joining the coastal extremes passes over the northern flank of the mountain.

 

12. Gunung Semeru Java

12. A line from the northern extreme of Java passing over the summit of Gunung Semeru extends to the western peninsula of Java. The line passes over a base point on this peninsula. The precise line joining the coastal extremes passes over the southern flank of the mountain.

 

13. Gunung Rantemario Sulawasi

13. A line from Gunung Rantemario passing over the southern extreme of Sulawesi extends to the eastern peninsula of Palau Banta. The line passes to a base point on this finger like peninsula which is about one kilometre in length. The precise line joining the coastal extremes extends to the flank of the mountain.

 

14. Mt Etna Sicily

14. A line from the southern extreme of Sicily passing over the summit crater of Mount Etna extends to the finger like peninsula on the western extreme of Isola Vulcano. The precise line joining the coastal extremes passes over a crater’s edge on the summit of Mount Etna.

 

15. Mount Siple. Antarctica. No data.

 

16. Pico Duarte Hispaniola

16. A line from the eastern extreme of Hispaniola passing over the summit of Pico Duarte extends to the southern peninsula of Ile de la Gonave. This alignment cuts through the southern peninsula of Ile de Gonave. The precise line joining the coastal extremes passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

17. Piton des Neiges Reunion

17. A line from the western extreme of Reunion passing over the summit of Piton des Neiges extends to the island’s eastern extreme peninsula. The peninsula is chevron shaped and the line extends to the base of the chevron.

 

18. Heleakala Maui

18. A line from the south summit of Haleakala passing over the northern extreme of Maui extends to the eastern peninsula of Moloka’i. The line passes to a base point on the peninsula. From the tip of the peninsula the line passes over the northern extreme point to a point on the flank of the mountain. Both lines are shown.

 

19. Gunung Agung Bali

19. A line from the western extreme of Bali passing over the summit of Gunung Agung extends to the eastern peninsula of the island. The line to the precise eastern extreme passes over the flank of the mountain. Both lines are shown.

 

20. Gunung Binaiya Ceram

20. A line from the summit of Gunung Binaiya passing over the northern peninsula of Ceram extends to the western extreme of Misool. The precise line passing over the two landmass extremes extends to the flank of the mountain.

 

21. Pico Basil bioko

21. A line from the summit of Pico de Santa Isabel passing over the northern peninsula of Bioko extends to the southern shore of a small alluvial island.

 

22. Mount Stephenson (Antarctica, no data.)

 

23. Ramelau timor

23. A line from the summit of Ramelau passing over the southern extreme of Timor extends to the eastern extreme of the neighbouring landmass.

 

24. Mt Apo mindanao philippines

24. A line from the summit of Mount Apo passing over the southern extreme of Mindanao extends to the western peninsula of Balut. The finger like peninsula is about two kilometres in length and the line cuts through the finger.

 

25. Mt Pulag luzon phillipines

25. A line from the summit of Mount Pulag passing over the northern extreme of Luzon extends to the southern peninsula of Taiwan. The southern peninsula has the appearance of a finger and thumb, the line passes to the base point shared by the two.

 

26. Mt Paget South Georgia

26. A line from the summit of Mount Paget passing to the western peninsula of South Georgia also passes over the eastern extreme of the rock island between the two points. (This is similar to alignment 16.)

 

27.Maromokotro Madagascar

27. A line from the summit of Maromokotro passing over the beach at the base of the island’s eastern peninsula extends to the western peninsula of Mauritius. A line joining the two peninsula tips extends to the flank of Maromokotro.

 

28. Shishaldin Unimak isle Alaska

28. A line from the summit of Shishaldin volcano passing over the northern extreme of Unimak Island extends to the long thin western peninsula of Hagemeister Island.

 

29. Fogo Pico de Cano Cape Verde

29. A line from the western extreme of Fogo (Cape Verde Isles) passing over the summit of Pico de Cano extends to a base point on the western peninsula of Santiago.  The precise line joining the two landmass extremes passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

30. Mt Ruapehu New Zealand

30. A line from the eastern extreme of North Island (New Zealand) passing over the summit of Mount Ruapehu extends to the tip of the northern peninsula of South Island.

 

31. Mount Francis. (Antarctica, no data)

 

32. Big Ben Heard and McDonald isles

32. Heard Island and its small companion 45 kilometres distant, McDonald Island, are among the most remote islands on the planet. Both islands have a single long spine like peninsular on their eastern extremes. The line joining the tips of these two peninsulas passes over the summit of Mawson Peak on Heard Island. (Mawson Peak, also called Big Ben, is higher than any point in Australia.)

 

33. Gunung Tambora Sumbawa Indonesia

33. A line from the eastern extreme of Sumbawa in Indonesia passing over the summit crater of Gunung Tambora extends to the eastern extreme of Pulau Mojo.

 

34. Mt Balbi Bougainville png

34. A line from the summit of Mount Balbi passing over the northern extreme of Bougainville extends to the western peninsula of Buka island. The finger like peninsula is about five kilometres in length, the line passes to the base of the finger. Joining the two landmass extremes the line extends to the base of Mount Balbi.

 

35. Mt Cinto corsica

35. A line from the summit of Monte Cinto passing over the southern extreme of Corsica extends to the northern extreme of Sardinia.

 

36. Kapalatmada Buru indonesia

36. A line from the western extreme of Buru passing over the summit of Kapalatmada extends to the chevron shaped western peninsula of Pulau Manipa. The precise line joining the tip of the chevron to the western extreme of Buru passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

37. Barbeau Peak Ellesmere isle Canada

37. A line from the southern extreme of Ellesmere Island passing over the summit of Barbeau Peak extends to the northern peninsula of Ellesmere Island. The definition is indistinct on Google Earth, perhaps the line intersects a base point on this northern extreme.

 

38. Mt Halcon Mindoro Phillipines

38. A line joining the eastern and western extremes of Mindoro passes over the flank of Mount Halcon.

 

39. Mt Darwin Tierra Del Fuego

39. A line from the summit of Mount Darwin passing over the eastern peninsula of Isla Grande, Tierra del Fuego, extends to the northern extreme of Observatorio. The line passes over the base of the peninsula, the precise line joining the two coastal extremes passes to the flank of Mount Darwin.

 

40. Mt Vineuo Goodenough Isle PapNG

40. A line from the western peninsula of Goodenough island passing over the summit of Mount Vineuo extends to the western extreme of Fergusson island.

 

41. Pidurutalagala Sri Lanka

41. From a point on the western peninsula of Sri Lanka a line passing over the summit of Pidurutalagala extends to an isolated skerry off the east coast of the island. (This alignment is discussed in Sacred Geometry of the Earth)

 

42. Mount Parry, Antarctica, no data.

 

43. Mt Ida Crete

43. A line from the summit of Mount Ida passing over the northern extreme of Crete extends to the northern peninsula of Antikythera. The precise alignment between the peninsula tips extends to the flank of Mount Ida.

 

44. Canlaon Peak Negros Phillipines

44. A line from the southern extreme of Negros (Philippines) passing over the flank of Canlaon Peak extends to the northern extreme of Negros.

 

45. Roque de los Muchachos La Palma Spain

45. A line from the summit of Roque de los Muchachos passing over the eastern extreme of La Palma extends to the base of the eastern peninsula on Tenerife. The precise line joining the coastal extremes extends to the flank of the summit point on Roque de los Muchachos.

 

46. Poco Ngandonalu Flores Indonesia

46. A line from the western extreme of Flores passing over the summit of Poco Ngandonalu extends to the rocky surf on the eastern extreme of Flores.

 

47. Kartala Grande Comore Comoros

47. A line from the summit of Kartala passing over the base of the eastern peninsula of Grande Comore extends to the northern peninsula of Moheli. The more precise line joining the two coastal extremes passes over the flank of Kartala.

 

48. Pico Mt Pico portugal

48. A line from the finger of land on Pico’s western extreme passing over the summit crater of Mount Pico extends to the eastern extreme of Pico. (The western fingertip shares the latitude of a second western extreme point to the north.)

 

49. New Ireland High Point. Pap NG

49. A line from the summit of Mount Taron passing over the southern peninsula of New Ireland extends to the western extreme of Madau Island. The precise line joining the coastal extremes passes over the flank of Mount Taron.

 

50. Vulkan Alaid Ostrov Atlasova Russia

50. A line from the western extreme on Atlasov Island passing over the summit crater of Vulkan Alaid extends to the northern extreme of Paramushir Island.

 

51. Mt Popomanaseu Guadalcanal Solomons

51. A line from the western extreme of Guadalcanal passing over the summit of Mount Popomanaseu extends to the southern extreme of the island.

 

52. Mt Ulawun New Britain PapNG

52. A line from the southern extreme of New Britain passing over the summit of Mount Ulawun extends to the northern peninsula of the island. The precise line joining the two landmass extremes passes over the flank of the mountain.

 

53. Mount Gaudry, Antarctica. No data.

 

54. Mount Irving, Antarctica. No data.

 

55. Asahi-dake Hokkaido Japan

55. A line from the summit of Asahi-dake passing over the eastern extreme of Hokkaido extends to the western side of the small island of Akiyurito, but misses the western peninsula tip by about 250 meters. The precise line joining the two landmass extreme points passes over the flank of Asahi-dake.

 

56. Beerenberg Jan Mayen

56. A line from the eastern extreme of Jan Mayen passing over the summit crater of Beerenberg extends to the southern extreme of Jan Mayen.